DAXMA – Ruins Upon Ruins EP

Two years on from their devastating ‘The Head Which Becomes The Skull’ Californian doomsters Daxma (pronounced Dahk-ma) unleash a career best with the ‘Ruins Upon Ruins’ EP. Their first release for Blues Funeral Records, it might look like a stop-gap since it features just two songs but the reality is somewhat different. Each of the featured pieces stretches beyond ten minutes (one even fills a full quarter of an hour), meaning that, combined, the two riff laden offerings actually have a running time that’s almost as long as various rock LPs from the late 60s.

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Danny Kirwan (13 May 1950 – 8 June 2018)

When most people talk about the blues era of Fleetwood Mac, they’ll inevitably talk about Peter Green.  When most people talk about Fleetwood’s first excursions away from blues and into pop-rock, they’ll mention Christine McVie joining the band and/or guitarist Bob Welch.

There was one man who helped steer the band from 1969 through to 1972, through their most tricky times: their third guitarist Danny Kirwan.

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THE GREAT 70s PROJECT: 1970/71 Revisited

Between May and July 2017, Real Gone embarked on an ambitious audio project.   A huge library of streaming audio, ‘The Great 70s Project’ became one of the year’s most popular features.

The plan was to delve deep into the decade’s music, but dig much deeper than revisiting the hits.  We hoped that by presenting the hits alongside some fabulous album cuts and neglected b-sides, our look at the decade would create new favourites and also encourage listens to long neglected albums.

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The Great 70s Project: 1979

Looking back, the three years between the disco and pop oriented sounds of 1976 and the majestic jumble of influences that fill 1979 are a huge gulf. By 1979, disco was on it’s last legs, punk had firmly given airtime to what we now think of as new wave and the pop music of the day was about as strong as it had been since 1975.

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The Great 70’s Project: 1977

On December 1st 1976, UK TV history was made.  On Bill Grundy’s Today show, the Sex Pistols and a couple of their associated chums shocked a nation.  Their behavior was quickly seen as inappropriate for most of the 1970s public and by the time their interview concluded with Steve Jones calling Grundy “a fucking rotter”, things had moved from merely “inappropriate” to “causing outrage”.

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