The Great 70s Project: 1972

1972 AD.  The year that bored suburban teens attempted to resurrect Dracula, in a much maligned Hammer film that’s actually quite good fun.  The year that Bolan’s musical craft was at its most perfect; the year Ziggy Stardust came to Earth and changed Bowie’s fortunes forever.

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The Great 70s Project: 1971

Welcome to a look back at some of our favourite music from 1971. In some ways, it seems the perfect continuation of 1970, with the hard rock pioneers releasing some of the best albums of the careers.

Looking elsewhere, though, things are perhaps more interesting…

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REAL GONE GOES OUT: Ian Anderson, Ramblin’ Man Fair, Maidstone, Kent 26/07/2015

It’s approximately 6:45 PM and it’s finally stopped raining after about twelve hours.  It’s wet and cold and half the field’s population are still shuffling about draped in waterproof macs.  French progressive black metallers Alcest are coming to the end of their set.  Their wall of sound approach is definitely an acquired taste and often makes a lot of their material indistinct within the live scenario, with only occasional tinkly prog flourishes cutting through massive doom riffs.  Even so, it’s been enjoyable…and as they churn out their last few oppressively heavy chords (for Alcest have arguably been the heaviest band to appear at the festival), the sun finally breaks through – too little, too late – causing a beam of light to centre upon the middle of the crowd.  Had this occurred barely minutes later, you could even jest that it was stage managed, as was such a spooky spectacle.  This of course, is the only sunshine we’ve seen all day, and with that, it sheepishly hides back behind a huge blanket of cloud and decides that it’s all too hard.

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Glenn Cornick: 23rd April 1947 – 29th August 2014

On August 29th 2014, bassist Glenn Cornick passed away after suffering heart failure.  Although he recorded with a variety of bands including Wild Turkey and Paris, it is for his contribution to Jethro Tull’s early, Mr. Cornick will be most fondly remembered.

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